jasmine


  • kimiha
    Participant

    i think jasmine is a pretty name. i kind of forgot about it. i dont think its popular any more. and ive hardly ever met any jasmines anyway. i think its a nice alternative flower name to the popular rose and lily. now violet is way up there. i heard a comment once that jasmine is a trashy name. is it trashy? or dated? not sure. what do you think of it?

    thanks

Viewing 12 replies - 1 through 12 (of 12)
  • TwoSapphires
    TwoSapphires
    Participant

    I think it’s really pretty. I’m not totally surprised some might say it’s trashy; I think since it’s a Disney princess name and some think it’s a little “stripperish” … but the 3 Jasmines I know all actually come from pretty conservative families and are really sweet girls. I also wouldn’t be surprised if some think it’s dated since it was more popular in the 90s. I personally still think it’s really pretty though and would love to meet another little Jasmine. (The youngest one I know is 8 or 9 now.)

    jenni_lynn91
    jenni_lynn91
    Participant

    I love this name! Jasmine is my favorite Disney princess lol. The name is popular in Connecticut where I live. Its not extremely popular like Olivia and Isabella, but I have met a few Jasmines working in the public schools. This was one of the names my fiance and I both liked, but it is pronounced different in Spanish. He told me the other day Yasmin is pronounced like Jasmine and Jasmin is pronounced Has-meen. I definitely do not think it is trashy.

    lcd1912
    lcd1912
    Participant

    A co-worker of mine has a teenager named Jasmine and she is always telling us how much her daughter dislikes her name. Her daughter’s reasoning is that she was the only “Jasmine” in her primarily Caucasian community..the ones she did meet were never Caucasian they were everything but! African American, Indian, Spanish, etc. My roommate in college was actually of Indian descent and named Jasmine. To me, that just makes it the perfect universal/American name, but she grew up feeling uncomfortable I guess?

    jenni_lynn91
    jenni_lynn91
    Participant

    Lcd,
    That is interesting to hear. I live in a diverse community, so I have met girls named Jasmine who were all different nationalities. There are two Jasmine’s who go to my church who are both in their 20′s; one is from Ghana and the other is Hispanic. Working in the schools I have also met a blonde haired, blue eyed girl named Jasmine and dark haired, brown or green eyed Jasmines. I can picture any type of girl with this name.

    rylane46
    rylane46
    Participant

    I actually prefer Jasmine over the ever popular Rose, Lily and Violet.

    My girls cheered last year and there were two Jasmines…one goes by her whole name, the other goes primarily by Jazzy (one is blonde, one is brunette). I hate it when Jasmine turns into Jazmyn or whatever though.


    kimiha
    Participant

    i was also thinking, i can picture this name on a beautiful african american, indian or middle eastern girl. but i cant see it as well on a white or asian. although i did know a chinese,korean girl named this. but she pronounced it jeh-ju-meen. lol. so it took me a while to realize she was saying jasmine. thats how koreans would pronounce it. i assume spanish would say has-meen although ive never heard that. i also like the arabic yasmin. pronounced yas-meen not yazz-min.

    TheWishingStar
    TheWishingStar
    Participant

    I’ve honestly never met a Caucasian Jasmine, but I don’t see why it couldn’t be used on a white girl. It’s an English word, and not really an unheard of name at all. I have met a number of Jasmines of all different ethnicities as well. I feel like it makes a pretty good global name. Wouldn’t be weird to other cultures, which is a definite bonus.

    That said, though, I like Lily, Violet, and Rose all more than I like Jasmine. I don’t really know why, something about Jasmine just doesn’t appeal to me that much. I’m also not crazy about using Disney names just in general. I love Disney, but I’m glad there’s not a hugely popular character with the same name as me…

    Phlutegirl
    Phlutegirl
    Participant

    Jasmine has always had a bit of a downmarket, trashy vibe to me. If you look at the popularity curve for Jasmine, you can see that it rocked to popularity out of seemingly nowhere. Names that rise quickly tend to fall just as fast, and it seems as though Jasmine is finally loosing some steam, and will probably start to drop from the charts very quickly over the next 5-10 years. 20 years from now, it will be just as dated to 90s and 2000s as Debra is to the 50s.

    I linked to the names so you can observe the popularity graph of the names and see what I mean when I say that names that rise quickly tend to fall quickly too. The popularity graph for Debra is perfect for illustrating a name that is a passing trend. A name with staying power has a slower dips and falls to its popularity. Thus, those names are considered “classic” and not dated to a particular generation. (Like Catherine for example).


    kimiha
    Participant

    phlutegirl, really good point! thats why i think it is so hard choosing a girls name. names rise greatly in popularity and fall fast each decade or two. debra is a great example. also jennifer of the 70s and 80s, Amanda of the 90s and unfortunately the same may happen to the beautiful sophia of current times.

    Phlutegirl
    Phlutegirl
    Participant

    Sophia will probably have more staying power than some of the others. Check out the popularity curve on it. It took several decades for it to drop to the 700s, and several more decades to rise back to the top of the list. It’s got a much more gradual curve. To me, it has the markings of a classic name and isn’t a “flash in the pan” kind of name. Also, Sophia is a great example of the “Hundred Year Rule” which says that the popularity of names cycles around every hundred years. Sophia was popular in the 1880s and 1890s, then it fell out of style for a while, but never completely off the chart, and it started to gain popularity in the 1908s and 1990s. Amanda is also another great example of the “Hundred Year Rule.” It’s actually a really old name and it was fairly popular in the 1880s, went out of style for a while, and then it climbed its way back up to the top of the charts in the 1970s and 80s.


    kimiha
    Participant

    wow didnt know that about amanda. i agree sophia has a more classic appeal to it so it could stay even though its super popular now.

    TwoSapphires
    TwoSapphires
    Participant

    I’ve known kids of all nationalities named Jasmine.

Viewing 12 replies - 1 through 12 (of 12)

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